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Project Breaking Ground to host open house on May 12

Project Breaking Ground will host an open house from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday (May 12) at the three-quarter acre community garden that flanks the Barren County Detention Center at 201 Samson St. in Glasgow.

Incarcerated women and WKU Glasgow undergraduate students enrolled in Dr. Nicole Breazeale's Sociology of Agriculture & Food class pose around a 30-foot hugelkultur raised bed that they constructed in the jail garden as part of Project Breaking Ground.

Incarcerated women and WKU Glasgow undergraduate students enrolled in Dr. Nicole Breazeale’s Sociology of Agriculture & Food class pose around a 30-foot hugelkultur raised bed that they constructed in the jail garden as part of Project Breaking Ground.

Dr. Nicole Breazeale, a WKU Assistant Professor of Sociology and coordinator of the project, is pleased with the project’s progress and wants the community to see what is occurring.

“We hope our friends and supporters in the community will come see firsthand what can be accomplished in three months when WKU Glasgow students, incarcerated individuals, jail staff, and community partners work together to build a productive, healing jail garden using sustainable agriculture techniques,” Breazeale said.

Project Breaking Ground is a sustainable jail garden and food justice project. It began as a service-learning project in January 2016 and has integrated students from three disciplines, including Sociology, Agriculture and Psychological Sciences. The project has more than a dozen community partners and continues to build on the strengths of this rural community and the regional campus that serves it.

“Project Breaking Ground has been a tremendously inspiring and healing process for all of us involved — the undergraduates, inmates, jail staff, community and University partners, and even myself.  I am so proud of what we have accomplished and look forward to celebrating all the hard work that has gone into transforming our minds, bodies, and spirits, along with this little piece of land,” Breazeale said.

For information and photos about the project, “like” Breaking Ground: A Sustainable Jail Garden/Food Justice Project on Facebook. For directions or any further questions, contact Dr. Nicole Breazeale at nicole.breazeale@wku.edu or (859) 967-6983.

Contact: John Roberts, (270) 659-6984

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